Why is it that when protestants say the Our Father, they add "For thine is the kingdom the power and the glory. Amen" Why don't Catholics say this out side of Mass? Where and why did this start?

Since You Asked
Protestant
 
Q Why is it that when protestants say the Our Father, they add "For thine is the kingdom the power and the glory. Amen" Why don't Catholics say this out side of Mass? Where and why did this start?
- Bettina
 
A

The words commonly added to the end of the Our Father by Protestants (and by Catholics at Mass) is called a 'doxology.'  In Greek doxa means 'glory' therefore a doxology is a short prayer of praise.  A well known Catholic doxology is the Glory Be

In the Gospels the Our Father appears twice, in slightly different versions, at Matthew 6:9-13 and Luke 11:2-4.  Luke's version does not have the doxology as part of the prayer, while some ancient manuscripts of Matthew's Gospel conclude the prayer with it.  Because most manuscripts did not contain those words most Biblical scholars believe that they were added by a scribe who simply thought it would be a good ending to the prayer.  Remember that before the inventing of the printing press in 1456 all manuscripts were copied by hand.  So whoever copied the manuscript which had the addition of the doxology would also contain it.

There is nothing at all wrong with adding those words at the end of the Our Father - they are beautiful.  It simply has never been a part of the Catholic version of the prayer because it wasn't part of the prayer that Jesus taught to His disciples.

- Fr Bob
Protestant